Removing a Non-Load Bearing Wall

Removing an existing interior wall is an easy way to create more usable space without the expense of building an addition. Removing a wall turns two small rooms into a large space perfect for family living. Adding new walls in a larger area creates a private space to use as a quiet study or as a new bedroom. but now can I really remove a non-load-bearing? and if I can, then how?

I have made deep research on the internet and out the net, and I’m saying that you can do it by Using a utility knife to score the intersections where the wall you’re removing meets the ceiling, Use the side of a hammer to punch a starter hole in the drywall, Reroute outlets, switches, plumbing, or ductwork. Locate the closest permanent studs on the adjacent wall or walls with a stud finder, Remove the wall studs by cutting through them in the middle, Cut through the wall’s top plate, Remove the soleplate, Patch the walls and ceiling with strips of drywall.

Before You Start

avoid load-bearing walls

Be sure the wall you plan to remove is not load-bearing( Partition walls are interior walls that do not carry the structural weight of the house. They have a single top plate and can be perpendicular to the floor and ceiling joists but are not aligned above support beams. Any interior wall that is parallel to floor and ceiling joists is a partition wall. ) before you begin.

If you need to remove a load-bearing wall, check with a contractor or building inspector first. Load-bearing walls carry the weight of the structure above them. You’ll need to install a temporary support wall to take the place of the structural wall you’re removing.

avoid plumb&wire rough-ins

Remember that walls also hold the essential mechanical systems that run through your home. You need to consider how your project affects these mechanicals. Turn off electrical power at the service panel before you begin demolition.

Tools & Materials

  • Stud finder
  • Tape measure
  • Utility knife
  • Hammer
  • Pry bars
  • Reciprocating or circular saw
  • Drill
  • Eye and ear protection

How to Remove a Non-Load-Bearing Wall

1. Use a utility knife to score the intersections where the wall you’re removing meets the ceiling to keep from damaging it during wall removal. Pry away baseboard trim and remove receptacle plates and switch covers to prepare for demolition.

2. Use the side of a hammer to punch a starter hole in the drywall, then carefully remove the drywall with a pry bar. Try to pull off large sections at a time to minimize dust. Remove any remaining drywall nails or screws from the wall studs.

3. Reroute outlets, switches, plumbing, or ductwork. Have professionals do this for you if you are not experienced with these systems or confident in your skills. This work should be inspected after it is completed.

4. Locate the closest permanent studs on the adjacent wall or walls with a stud finder, and carefully remove the drywall up to these studs. Score the drywall first with a utility knife, then cut through it with a circular saw.

5. Remove the wall studs by cutting through them in the middle with a reciprocating saw and prying out the upper and lower sections. Remove the endmost studs where the wall meets an adjacent wall or walls.

6. Cut through the wall’s top plate with a circular saw or reciprocating saw. Pry out the top plate sections carefully to avoid damaging the ceiling

7. Remove the soleplate just as you did the top plate by cutting through it and prying up the long pieces.

8. Patch the walls and ceiling with strips of drywall, and repair the floor as needed with new floor coverings.

How much does it cost to remove a non-load bearing wall?

On average, everyone pays $300 to $1,000 to remove a non-load-bearing wall in his home. The factor to precise the costs are the number of supply lines on the wall( water, HVAC, and plumbing lines) and the size of the work. also, you the cost of the professional, because you will not need a support structure but a professional. and there are some contractors that afford this job with this price:

Low: $400
(removal of a non-load bearing wall with no pipes and minimal wires)
High: $3,000
(removal of a load-bearing wall and the installation of a steel beam with new drywall).

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